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Free Admission to the Hammer Museum for exhibitions Zarina: Paper Like Skin & Graphic Design: Now in Production

  |   2012

Free Admission to the Hammer Museum During “Carmageddon II” Sept. 29-30 Opening weekend for exhibitions Zarina: Paper Like Skin and Graphic Design: Now in Production.

September 29 is the opening day for two major exhibitions at the Hammer— Zarina: Paper Like Skin and Graphic Design: Now in Production. Also, on September 30 at 2pm, the artist Zarina will be on hand for a conversation with curator Allegra Pesenti. Admission and events are free.

Zarina: Paper Like Skin
September 29 – December 30, 2012

Zarina: Paper Like Skin is the first retrospective of the Indian-born American artist Zarina, featuring approximately 60 works dating from 1961 to the present. Paper is central to Zarina’s practice, both as a surface to print on and as a material with its own properties and history. Works in the exhibition include woodcuts as well as three-dimensional casts in paper pulp. Zarina’s vocabulary is minimal yet rich in associations with her life and the themes of displacement and exile. The concept of home—whether personal, geographic, national, spiritual, or familial—resonates throughout her oeuvre. Organized by Allegra Pesenti, curator, Grunwald Center for the Graphic Arts. The exhibition will travel to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum in New York from January 25 to April 21, 2013, and the Art Institute of Chicago from June 27 to September 22, 2013.

Zarina: Paper Like Skin is made possible by a major gift from Susan Steinhauser and Daniel Greenberg/The Greenberg Foundation.

Generous support was also provided by the E. Rhodes and Leona B. Carpenter Foundation, Susie Crippen, the Audrey & Sydney Irmas Charitable Foundation, the LLWW Foundation, Catherine Glynn Benkaim and Barbara Timmer, and Christie’s. Special thanks to Luhring Augustine, New York.

A Conversation with Zarina
Sunday, September 30, 2pm

Join the artist Zarina and curator Allegra Pesenti for a conversation in the galleries.

Graphic Design: Now in Production
September 29, 2012 – January 6, 2013

This major international exhibition explores how graphic design has broadened its reach over the past decade, expanding from a specialized profession to a widely used tool. With the rise of accessible creative software and innovations in publishing and distribution systems, people outside the field are mobilizing the techniques and processes of design to create and publish visual media. At the same time, graphic designers are becoming producers, deploying their creative skills as makers of content and shapers of experiences. Featuring work produced since 2000 in the most vital sectors of communication design, Graphic Design: Now in Production explores design-driven magazines, newspapers, books, posters, and branding programs, showcasing recent developments in the field, such as the entrepreneurial nature of designer-produced goods; the renaissance in digital typeface design; the storytelling potential of titling sequences for film and television; and the transformation of raw data into compelling information narratives. Organized by the Walker Art Center and the Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, Graphic Design: Now in Production is the largest museum exhibition on the subject since the Walker’s seminal 1989 exhibition Graphic Design in America: A Visual Language History, and the Cooper-Hewitt’s 1996 comprehensive survey, Mixing Messages: Graphic Design in Contemporary Culture.

Graphic Design: Now in Production is co-organized by the Walker Art Center, Minneapolis, and the Smithsonian’s Cooper-Hewitt, National Design Museum, New York. Lead curators are Andrew Blauvelt, curator of architecture and design at the Walker Art Center, and Ellen Lupton, senior curator of contemporary design at Cooper-Hewitt.
The Hammer’s presentation is organized by Brooke Hodge, director, exhibitions management and publications.

The Hammer
10899 Wilshire Blvd. Los Angeles, CA 90024
(310) 443-7000
Tue – Fri 11am – 8pm
Sat & Sun 11am – 5pm
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